Things I Missed About Japan

I spent almost 2 full months in South Korea before going back to Japan to obtain a certain Korean working visa, and realized while being in Korea, and when arriving back in Japan of several things I missed about Japan.

  1. The Food
    • I mean who doesn’t love Japanese food! Tonkatsu, Tonkotsu Ramen, Curry Rice, Yaki Udon…
  2. The Culture
    • I had gotten so damn used to how polite the Japanese have to be, and how polite they simply are, that I started to see it as the “norm.”  What I mean by the “norm,” is that now I compare every other culture to the Japanese, as well as to American too, but that defeats the purpose.
  3. The Language
    • Although I spoke some Japanese during my stay in Busan – it was not the same as talking with my Japanese friends in person and being able to use the Kansai dialect without having to concern myself with the other person not understanding it.  I mean, the language was the reason why I went to Japan in the first place!
  4. The Country
    • I was quite emotionally devastated during my last few days in Kyoto before I left for Busan, but I didn’t let it show! (not sure if that’s something I should be proud of or not…) But let’s think about this for a second – why was I feeling that way?  Was it because I didn’t want to separate from my friends?  No, it was simply the fact that I love the city of Kyoto and was sad to be leaving it after 1.3 years of living there.  And then I came back to Japan, and realized that Japan really is apart of me!  When sitting at the train station waiting for the train, I noticed myself feeling happy from just looking at the scenery in front of me; I’ve grown very fond of how Japan has developed their infrastructure and cities.  I found myself feeling the same way as I gazed upon the view from the top of Namba’s Park of Osaka city…
  5. The Order
    • Dare I say it…I actually missed how structured everything is!  It may be because of how unorganized a certain organization is here in South Korea, but it does make a significant difference for the organization, its members, and others directly and indirectly influenced by it.  Structure is necessary for organization, for society to be civil, and it comforts those afraid of risk, danger, and unknown potential and hazardous things.

I’m sure the same can be said about many other countries and their respective cultures, but do you have any similar experiences with Japan?  Let me know!

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